Fuji X-Pro1 camera test

Fuji X-Pro1 camera test

 

I have found what I have been looking for! I have had Canon G6, G7, G9 G10, G11 and G1x, I’ve had Fuji x100, Canon S90, Sony RX100, Ive had Olympus Pen EP1, I’ve had Coolpixs, I’ve had Iphone 5 (!) and I’ve had Holgas and Lomo… My work kit is a Canon 6d and 5d2 but I can’t settle on a ‘carry round camera’ (snap camera, spare camera, party camera, travel camera etc etc)….until now!  I LOVE the Fuji X-Pro 1.

Before you say it, I know its much much more than a ‘snappy’ camera, its a whole system, capable of top quality results.  But I love it because its small, light and easy to carry, it has a range of lenses available, and it is extremely well made…. it feels ‘heavy’ (in a good way!), its metal and it looks beautiful.  It harks back to the Rangefinder cameras of the past, and looks (a bit) like an old Leica…

I have the 18mm f2 wide angle lens, the 35mm f1.4 ‘standard’ lens and the 60mm macro lens… it has an APS size sensor, and optical or electronic viewfinder.  I am not, in the slightest bit, a techy person, and this is not a proper camera ‘test’ (go here to the best reviewers there are, for a full test) but I do use my cameras a lot.  My images are used in magazines, books and websites, and my agents, Corbis, Getty, Alamy, GapPhotos etc distribute my pictures all over the world, so a camera has to hold its own to keep its place on my camera bag! (a Billingham by the way… 30 years old and still going!).
Flower Photography

 

Flower Photography

All the images above were shot with the 60 mm macro lens, and being a user of Canon equipment, and a shooter of flowers, the macro is a very important lens in my set up.  I was astonished at the quality of the pictures. These were shot at Bristol Botanic Gardens, without a tripod, handheld using manual focus (yes it can manual focus… essential for close ups I think)… they are sharp, and with a wide aperture, you can get that lovely ‘Bokeh’ effect.

The 35mm lens has a really fast aperture (1.4) which makes it ideal for a ‘party’ snap camera, or for low light shots… These were taken in The Pigs Nose Inn, East Prawle in Devon… no flash, just a wide aperture and 1600 ISO.. the quality at even 3200 ISO is something to behold!

Pub Photography in low light

and the sharpness of the lens really is wonderful…

Close up photography

 

Mid range shot with XF35 f1.4

The wide angle 18mm f2 is great for interiors work (something I do a lot of) and this image was shot at high ISO in Laurie Lee’s old haunt, the Woolpack in Slad, Goucestershire… its crisp and clean, the lines are straight and there’s very little, if any, distortion.  Its a handheld shot, and again, the high ISO is barely visible.  A short drive away, at Painswick, is the lovely topiary in the church graveyard.  the 18mm lens at f8 captures the whole spire and a tiny bit of perspective correction in lightroom helps produce a sellable stock image…

Pub Photography in low light

 

Painswick with the Fuji XPro 1

As I said, I am not in the least a techy person, and I confess to not really reading most camera tests (!), but this post is just a ‘gut reaction’ to what I see as a brilliant camera… I know what I like, and need, in terms of camera gear, and this absolutely fits the bill for me at the moment.  More important than anything, in my view, is that I LOVE using it.  My most recent camera acquisition, before the X-Pro1, was the Sony RX100… I kept it for 4 months before getting rid of it… The X-Pro 1 is obviously a different beast entirely, but I can assure you that it will still be in my camera bag for a while to come!

 

This entry was posted in Garden Photography, Interior Photography, Mark Bolton Photography, Stock Photography, Travel Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , .

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