Tag Archives: plant photography

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Autumn at East Prawle

What a year for REAL seasons in the countryside of Britain.  We had a real cold winter, a wet spring, a LONG hot summer and now a colourful autumn. 

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Snowdrops at Avon Bulbs

It was a super windy day today (not great for photographing flowers in the outdoors!), so I found myself shooting the superb collection of Snowdrops (Galanthus) in the greenhouses at the excellent Avon Bulbs.

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Everything’s Gone Green

the lanes of south Devon… rich deep green, acid green, sage green, sea green, emerald green, neon green and bottle green..

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Hydrangea hanging on in there

Spotted and photographed this Hydrangea aspera flower caught in winter sunlight at Westonbirt Arboretum last winter… I’ve been editing some stock photography, destined for my agents (GapPhotos, Getty and Corbis mostly), and this one seemed rather pleasing…

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Westonbirt spring sunshine

Beautiful light yesterday morning for flower photography at Westonbirt… a great way to start the weekend, fresh air, (loud!) birdsong and a riot of colour from the Rhododendrons, Magnolias and windflowers… enchanting place…

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Spring is nearer….

Blossom at Bristol Botanic Gardens, spring is here!, Garden Photography

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Autumn Flower Photography for a cold winter day!

editing pics from a recent autumnal shoot at Bristol University Botanic Gardens, and the warmth of the colours is helping keep the frost out of this room! Its going to be a while before we see these colours again in the gardens of England

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More Snowdrops

Snowdrops are the subject of a plant ‘craze’ at the moment, and there are tales of single, rare snowdrop bulbs selling for hundreds of pounds on Ebay. Snowdrop fanatics are known as Galanthophiles and their ‘madness’ for the simple spring flower is a match for the Tulip craze of earlier centuries.

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